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  The Great Outdoors
   Charlemont,  MA      Call us at: 413-339-8373


THE DEERFIELD RIVER is A SOURCE OF HYDROELECTRIC POWER!

















Did you ever wonder where the river flow comes from?
There are a series of hydroelectric dams along the river which originates in southern Vermont and flows to the Connecticut River. Water from the river flow is stored in two reservoirs upstream and released daily by the power company in response to increased need for electricity (A.C.) during the summer months.

Before your trip.
Always check the  water line web site to determine river release times before you begin your day on the river.  Flow depends on many factors such as weather conditions and need for electricity.  Release times also vary - but are usually mid to late morning.

Download a map of your river run from the put-in at "Zoar Picnic Area" to the "Take-out" at Flag Pole Point.  Great Outdoors River Run.



River flow information For up-to-date Deerfield river flow information, please  click on the following  Daily River Flow Report   

-You can also call 1-800452-1737  ext 255126.  Plug this number into your cell phones.​


River Flow Measurement
River flow is estimated in cubic feet per second (CFS).  
The average flow on the Deerfield is 750 cfs.
The following chart will help you interpret the meaning of the rates.





​WHAT IS WATERLINE?
  • Waterline is a national electronic publication that provides river flow forecasts and water level reports over the telephone and on the Web. Waterline flow forecasts are provided by the controllers of the sites being forecast and are updated in real time. These forecasts are published simultaneously on the telephone hotline and here on Waterline's Web site. Most river level readings are taken from river gauges that report over the NOAA's GOES satellite system. These readings are taken directly from the satellite feed and are usually available on the hotline within two minutes from the time they are transmitted from the gauge.












Cubic feet per second (cfs)

100 - 400 cfs: Very slow moving water (no rapids) 

400 - 750 cfs: Gentle current  - too slow to tube

750 -1000 cfs Good flow - perfect conditions

1000 - 1200 cfs: Quicker water - beware of potentially dangerous conditions. Life jacket only

1200 - 1600 cfs: River access closed for tubers